Churchgoers Live Longer.

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A study reported by LiveScience has suggested that those who attend church happen to live longer. As such there are many things one seemingly can do to increase their life expectancy: “exercise, eat well, take your medication and… go to church.”

Researcher Daniel Hall, at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, seems to suggest that there is potential further study on the relation between religion, faith, and vitality: “While this study was not intended for use in clinical decision making, these findings tell us that there is something to examine further.”

Hall, an Episcopal priest himself, also comments: “But at the very least, it shows that further research into the associations between religion and health might have implications for medical practice.” However, Hall claims that “religious attendance is not a mode of medical therapy.”

Living longer may also be connected to the purpose provided by religious communities: “Being in a religious community helps you make meaning out of your life.”

However, Hall does caution others that few conclusions can be drawn from his study, and that further research is needed. “There is no evidence that changing religious attendance causes a change in health outcomes.”

One response to “Churchgoers Live Longer.

  1. Hello: I am a firm believer in the connection between living by God’s rules and living a fulfilling life. I found it curious, however, that you added “take your medications” along with other healthy practices. There are many natural ways to protect and enhance health. Though some medications truly are miraculous, it is a shame that so many people in our country run to take untested chemicals and shun holistic and naturopathic practices for good health — so many that now it seems natural to add “take your medications” as if everyone has many meds they must take for good health. Also, many studies have now been done showing the link between faith/religion/attitude and health.

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